The U. Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday sued Match Group , the online dating service company that owns Tinder, OKCupid and other dating sites, alleging that it used fake love interest advertisements to trick consumers into buying paid subscriptions. Match majority-owner InterActive Corp. In a statement to CNBC, Match said, “For nearly 25 years Match has been focused on helping people find love, and fighting the criminals that try to take advantage of users. The FTC has misrepresented internal emails and relied on cherry-picked data to make outrageous claims and we intend to vigorously defend ourselves against these claims in court. Sign up for free newsletters and get more CNBC delivered to your inbox.

Match Group stock slides after FTC sues the company for placing fake ads on its site

Or maybe it was a bot? The U. Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday announced it has sued Match Group , the owner of just about all the dating apps — including Match, Tinder, OkCupid, Hinge, PlentyofFish and others — for fraudulent business practices. According to the FTC, Match tricked hundreds of thousands of consumers into buying subscriptions, exposed customers to the risk of fraud and engaged in other deceptive and unfair practices.

The Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday sued online dating giant Match Group, the owner of OKCupid, Tinder and PlentyOfFish, for.

Match sent emails to non-subscribers telling them they had received a response on the site. But millions of emails referred to notices that came from accounts already flagged as likely fake, the FTC said Wednesday. The people who then subscribed in response to these messages, were potentially exposed to scammers. The FTC says that practice is unfair, placing people at risk of romance scams so that Match could make more money. Prices for Match. The FTC said hundreds of thousands of people subscribed to Match.

The FTC is also alleging that Match didn’t adequately disclose the requirements that consumers needed to get Match’s offer of a free six-month subscription if they did not “meet someone special,” and that it didn’t provide simple enough subscription-cancellation practices. The FTC started investigating Match. It said the government was making “completely meritless allegations supported by consciously misleading figures,” and that it would “vigorously” defend itself in court.

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FTC sues owner for connecting users to fake accounts, tricking consumers into upgrading

The Federal Trade Commission is suing the parent company behind dating sites Match. The FTC says Match Group allowed consumers who had created a profile for the sites but had not yet subscribed to receive emails expressing interest that Match Group knew were likely from fake accounts. The emails told the reader that someone was interested in their profile and allowed them access to a link that led them to a subscription page. Nearly , people subscribed to Match.

It also accused the company of making it hard for consumers to cancel their subscriptions or dispute charges. Open main navigation Live TV.

Dating site let scammers contact free users in order to push them into paying for subscriptions, government says.

Skip navigation. Match , the owner of Match. The agency also alleges that Match has unfairly exposed consumers to the risk of fraud and engaged in other allegedly deceptive and unfair practices. Match allows users to create Match. Specifically, when nonsubscribers with free accounts received likes, favorites, emails, and instant messages on Match. By contrast, Match prevented existing subscribers from receiving email communications from a suspected fraudulent account.

Consumers who considered purchasing a Match.

Dating website swiped married officer’s Facebook selfie to use in online ads: suit

By Lauren Fruen For Dailymail. Guzman, who is married with children, says his image was wrongly used in an Instagram post which identified him as ‘Jason, 33’ and ‘Single. Nah, it’s all muscle.

(Reuters) – The U.S. Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday sued Match Group Inc, the online dating service company that owns Tinder.

Trying to meet people, especially online is there any other way? Millions of people are trying to find love via dating websites, which means the competition is steep. So what makes people interested in someone else? That brings us to this hilarious yet unfortunate story. However, companies of all sorts have been caught in the past for wrongfully using images without permission simply because they came across a random image online. Also, the man is hot! So, of course, these online dating websites would want to attract users by using the image of an attractive young police officer in uniform as a way to lure in people who are starving for love or something else, wink wink.

But yeah, he said he did not write that either. NSI Holdings, owner of Cupid. First, they demanded that Guzman show identification, which he did promptly. Then NSI Holdings alleges that they found a dating profile that included his name, his age, and his birthdate and his email address.

Injured by Online Dating, Can I Sue?

A man is suing a woman for speaking unfavorable of him to other women. It all starting on a dating app. The Nashville man was featured in a News4 Investigates report that revealed women accuse him of threatening them, after they spoke badly about him on a now closed Facebook page. Horowitz said they have a competing expert report that shows the forensic data in Vonhartman’s lawsuit is not conclusive.

Are you saying she made this up? Get the latest news updates and video, 4WARN weather forecast, weather radar, special investigative reports, sports headlines and much more from News4 Nashville.

I’m not single: Married cop sues over use of photo to promote dating site. Ron Hurtibise. By Ron Hurtibise.

A dating site for “men and women in uniform” thought they found the perfect user profile to make the poster boy for their social media campaign: a smiling, single, handsome man dressed in police attire. But the man in the picture is a married officer and father, who insists he never made an account with the site, Uniformdating. Uniform Dating ran the ad in question using a picture of Guzman that identifies him as “Jason,” who is single.

Guzman said in his complaint he was shocked to see the ad and only learned of when multiple friends saw it and reached out. Guzman says he never used the site, and posted the photo which Uniform Dating used to his private Facebook page in April When Guzman asked NSI Holdings to stop using his image, the company first asked him to prove his identity. When he did, NSI Holdings continued using the image anyway, the complaint alleges.

In their motion to dismiss the suit, NSI Holdings says they took the image from a profile on their site, which they had permission to use. The company says it has permission to use any photo someone uploads to their site in advertisements, a clear part of their terms and conditions. Guzman is seeking statutory damages, actual and punitive damages, costs, interest, and restitution from NSI Holdings for the use of the photograph.

Not enough fish: woman successfully sues dating agency over lack of men

The Federal Trade Commission announced Wednesday it’s suing Match, the owner of such popular online dating platforms as Match. The company allows potential customers to create a Match. According to the FTC, ads flagged by the company as a potential scam made its way to unpaid subscribers, but were blocked from being sent to paid subscribers. The allegations apply to Match.

A Florida woman has filed a $ billion class-action lawsuit against online dating site , alleging the website allowed photos of her.

Rich has been a Fool since and writing for the site since After 20 years of patrolling the mean streets of suburbia, he hung up his badge and gun to take up a pen full time. Having made the streets safe for Truth, Justice, and Krispy Kreme donuts, he now patrols the markets looking for companies he can lock up as long-term holdings in a portfolio.

His coverage reflects his passion for motorcycles, booze, and guns though typically not all exercised at the same time , but his writing also covers the broader sectors of consumer goods, technology, and industrials. So follow along as he tries to break down complex topics to make them more understandable and useful to the average investor. Have a story idea? Contact Rich here. I may not be able to respond to every suggestion, but I do read them all!

Think an article needs a correction? Reach Rich here. There are doubts that Facebook ‘s NASDAQ:FB new dating app can really get off the ground because of the numerous ways the social networking site has been accused of violating members’ privacy. Even though the services are being kept separate, many people may have reservations about how their privacy will be safeguarded. Knowing that a quarter or more of Match profiles may be fraudulent, and part of attempts “to perpetrate scams, including romance scams, phishing schemes, fraudulent advertising, and extortion scams,” in the words of the FTC, is going to make many think twice about turning over sensitive personal data to the site.

FTC sues Match Group: Fake love interest ads tricked consumers into subscriptions

By Dom DiFurio. The FTC’s suit said the company used ads that advertised messages like, “He just emailed you! Could he be the one? Between June and May , Match’s own analysis found nearly half a million people bought subscriptions within 24 hours of receiving the fraudulent messages, the FTC’s complaint said. Match vowed Wednesday to fight the agency’s claims in court.

Woman Sues Dating Site After Giving Brother When he was know the pain the comic strip atop her boyfriend’s. In her lawsuit, she alleges.

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